>As Betty and Wilma say, "CHARGE!"

>Children’s Book Shop proprietress Terri Schmitz talks with Kitty Flynn about children’s-book shopping for the holidays and recommending some of her favorites on our latest podcast.

I’ll be over soon, Terri. We’ve got this swell Dutch couple renting our first floor apt and they have two completely adorable kids–a one year old boy and a three year old girl. Richard and I feel like we’ve acquired grandchildren and are spoiling them appropriately. The little girl, of course, initially spoke no English, and she would talk away at us in Dutch, too young to understand that we couldn’t understand her. But then she and I had our Patty Duke–Anne Bancroft moment. She was talking to me in Dutch and clearly had an important question. I saw this little light go on in her eyes and she blurted, “Wheah’s Wichawd?” Thanks, kid– but spoken like a born Bostonian.

Roger Sutton About Roger Sutton

Roger Sutton has been the editor in chief of The Horn Book, Inc, since 1996. He was previously editor of The Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books and a children's and young adult librarian. He received his M.A. in library science from the University of Chicago in 1982 and a B.A. from Pitzer College in 1978. Follow him on Twitter: @RogerReads.



  1. >Anyone else feel crazy jealous of these two Dutch kids?

  2. >Ha! YES!!!!

  3. Roger Sutton says:

    >Told about this post by her parents, little Julia displayed her ever-increasing powers of English, harrumphing “they are NOT my grandparents. They are my NEIGHBORS.”

  4. >We had a young woman give a presentation at a staff meeting about Boston’s Hatian community. She spent a few minutes introducing herself and discussing what it’s like to be a Haitian-American in Boston. It was a bit disconcerting, however, to hear her make this presentation with a thick Dorchester — excuse me, Dawchestuh — accent.

    Anyway, there are a lot of kids now growing up speaking English in school and Spanish or other languages at home. It’s a challenge for parents to maintain bilingualism — what’s called heritage language proficiency — and also assure that kids get top notch English skills. I think it would be great for the Horn Book to cover children’s books in Spanish, and also any books that are specifically intended for kids who are growing up bilingual.

  5. >The Horn Book Guide includes reviews of hardcover Spanish-language books published in the US. We review bilingual books to the best of our ability (meaning, as long as we have a reviewer who can accurately assess the non-English text).


  6. Anonymous says:


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