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Civics and community

community_ancona_can we helpAncona, George  Can We Help?: Kids Volunteering to Help Their Communities
Gr. K–3     48 pp.     Candlewick

Straightforward text describes various ways that children can help those in need: through knitting hats for the homeless, tending a community garden that donates its produce, etc. Young readers may find the text cumulatively leaden, but they’ll pore over the color photos — they’re unpolished, befitting the subject matter — featuring kids hard at work but gleefully throwing themselves into community service.
Subjects: Social Issues; Behavior—Helpfulness; Volunteerism; Charities; Community helpers

community_clinton_it's your worldClinton, Chelsea  It’s Your World: Get Informed, Get Inspired & Get Going!
Gr. 4-6, middle school, high school     402 pp.     Philomel

This book is a combination of autobiography, information about various topics (almost too many), inspirational messages, and practical tips about what young people can accomplish. Sections on U.S. and world poverty, education, women’s rights, health care, and the environment are each appended with a long list of “Get Going!” action steps. Black-and-white photos and charts break up the browsable text. Ind.
Subjects: Social Issues; Activism

community_deedrick_teachers helpDeedrick, Tami  Teachers Help
Gr. K–3     24 pp.     Capstone

Ready, Dee  Police Officers Help
Gr. K–3     24 pp.     Capstone

Pebble Books: Our Community Helpers series. Each volume provides very basic information about the title community helper, with color photos, in four brief sections: “What Is a Teacher/Police Officer?”; “What Teachers/Police Officers Do”; “Tools Teachers Use”/”Clothes and Tools”; and “Teachers/Police Officers Help.” The content isn’t very informative (“Teachers check to make sure students are learning”), but the books could be useful for early reading support. Reading list. Glos., ind.
Subjects: Occupations and Careers; Teachers; Community helpers; Schools; Police officers

community_donovan_volunteering smartsDonovan, Sandy  Volunteering Smarts: How to Find Opportunities, Create a Positive Experience, and More
Middle school, high school     64 pp.     Twenty-First Century

USA Today Teen Wise Guides: Lifestyle Choices series. This solid discussion of the positive results of volunteering to follow a passion or to explore new interests gives advice on researching opportunities, starting independent projects, becoming an activist, and determining which project is a good match for a particular teen. USA Today “Snapshots” and articles add real-life context, but the tiny type is hard to read. The stock photos are generic. Reading list, websites. Bib., glos., ind.
Subjects: Government, Economics, and Education; Volunteerism

community_paul_whose hands are thesePaul, Miranda  Whose Hands Are These?: A Community Helper Guessing Book
Gr. K–3     32 pp.     Millbrook

Illustrated by Luciana Navarro Powell. “Taking notes, these hands are writing. / Breaking story? How exciting!” Told in rhymes that occasionally stumble, this survey of community helpers includes journalists, farmers, teachers, cooks, and architects. The friendly illustrations feature workers of different races, ethnicities, and ages. The guessing-game format will keep children engaged; this is a good choice for classroom use and one-on-one readings.
Subjects: Occupations and Careers; Community helpers; Stories in rhyme

From the January 2017 issue of Nonfiction Notes from the Horn Book.

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