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Brown Girl Dreaming: Author Jacqueline Woodson’s 2015 BGHB NF Honor Speech

woodson_brown girl dreaming

Hey Everybody. I want to thank the committee for choosing Brown Girl Dreaming as a Boston Globe–Horn Book honor book. It wasn’t an easy book to write — I know no book is easy — but Brown Girl Dreaming took me on a writing journey like no other. And while I’m grateful for that journey, […]

The Boys Who Challenged Hitler: Author Phillip Hoose’s 2015 BGHB NF Honor Speech

The Boys Who Challenged Hitler

In recent years I’ve endeavored to give young readers real-life protagonists their own age. I want my readers to ask themselves, “What would I have done?” I believe that teens experience sharper pangs of injustice than adults, and a greater determination to do something about it. Some, such as Claudette Colvin, have acted with amazing […]

Cartwheeling in Thunderstorms: Author Katherine Rundell’s BGHB 2015 Fiction Award Speech

Cartwheeling in Thunderstorms

The question I get asked most, when people find out what I do, is: why children’s books? Why not write proper books, for adults? My answer will depend on the day. Sometimes, in a bad mood, I say, “Well, they’re a lot shorter.” Sometimes I tell the truth: children are extraordinary readers. One of my […]

Challenger Deep: Author Neal Shusterman’s 2015 BGHB Fiction Honor Speech

Challenger Deep jacket

I can’t even begin to express how thrilled I am to accept this honor for Challenger Deep. I’d like to thank The Horn Book, the Boston Globe, and Simmons College for being such supporters of children’s literature. I don’t think Challenger Deep would have been possible without my fantastic editor, Rosemary Brosnan, who helped shape […]

Egg & Spoon: Author Gregory Maguire’s 2015 BGHB Fiction Honor Speech

maguire_eggandspoon

For my presence here this evening, I’m so grateful to the committee, and to the institutions of the Boston Globe, the Horn Book Magazine, and the Center for the Study of Children’s Literature at Simmons College, as host. I’m grateful to Liz Bicknell, my editor at Candlewick, and all the publicity and design people, especially […]

Trend alert: authors who <3 authors

viorst dedication 2

In the process of checking the bibliographic info of Judith Viorst’s forthcoming poetry collection What Are You Glad About? What Are You Mad About?: Poems for When a Person Needs a Poem (Atheneum/Dlouhy, February 2016), I happened to notice something a little more interesting than an ISBN: Visions ensued of a power friendship between two […]

David Fickling Talks with Roger

david fickling

Talks with Roger is a sponsored supplement to our free monthly e-newsletter, Notes from the Horn Book. To receive Notes, sign up here. David Fickling, editor, has been with us for quite some time, since 1978 when he began his career with Oxford University Press and subsequently the UK arms of Doubleday and Scholastic, bringing […]

Kevin Henkes Talks with Roger

kevin henkes

Talks with Roger is a sponsored supplement to our free monthly e-newsletter, Notes from the Horn Book. To receive Notes, sign up here. You ask some very great writers and illustrators about how they do what they do, and it can seem as much a mystery to them as it is to you. But Kevin […]

Five questions for Tomie dePaola

Photo: Julie Maris-Semel

1. You’ve illustrated books intended for a range of ages. What, in your experience, makes a good picture book for the very young? TD: Picture books for the young are the hardest, the most rewarding, and the most consequential task any illustrator/writer can tackle. The responsibility of introducing “The Book” to young children is awesome. […]

Parrotfish Needed an Update: The Rapidly Changing Language of Transgender Awareness

wittlinger_parrotfish update

A decade ago, I wrote Parrotfish, the first young adult novel with a transgender protagonist. At the time I wrote it, most of my (middle-aged) friends didn’t understand the meaning of the word transgender. They guessed that it meant cross-dresser or drag queen, but the topic was not one that straight, mainstream Americans thought about, […]