The Horn Book » Calling Caldecott http://www.hbook.com Publications about books for children and young adults Tue, 30 Sep 2014 11:12:29 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.8.4 What *about* those Caldecott criteria? http://www.hbook.com/2014/09/blogs/calling-caldecott/important-caldecott-criteria/ http://www.hbook.com/2014/09/blogs/calling-caldecott/important-caldecott-criteria/#comments Mon, 29 Sep 2014 16:00:39 +0000 http://www.hbook.com/?p=41283 Last week, Robin reminded us how crucial it is to keep the Caldecott criteria in mind as we examine this year’s picture books. We all know that the Caldecott rules and criteria are paramount and inviolable, and for decades committees have obsessively wrestled with the meanings and nuances of “excellence of execution in the artistic technique employed”; […]

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Last week, Robin reminded us how crucial it is to keep the Caldecott criteria in mind as we examine this year’s picture books. We all know that the Caldecott rules and criteria are paramount and inviolable, and for decades committees have obsessively wrestled with the meanings and nuances of “excellence of execution in the artistic technique employed”; “excellence of pictorial interpretation of story, theme, or concept”; “appropriateness of style of illustration to the story, theme or concept”; etc.

Aside from a few amendments to the rules added in later years, the Caldecott rules and criteria were written in 1937 (or earlier — sometime before the first Medal was awarded in 1938. I’m sure KT Horning could give us the exact date). That’s almost EIGHTY years ago. Wow.

To my mind, the Caldecott criteria are open-ended enough and yet specific enough to allow committees to home in on excellence and also permit some more envelope-stretching interpretation (The Invention of Hugo Cabret, anyone?). And it’s a testament to their timelessness that much of the criteria and rules have been picked up when newer awards have been established, such as the Sibert and the Geisel.

And yet…. the world has changed a lot in eighty years; the way books are published has changed; the format they are published in is changing; who is creating books is changing. Do the criteria still work? Are there some parts of the criteria that do not feel particularly timeless? i.e., that feel outdated in today’s world? Is there enough room in the Caldecott criteria to accommodate graphic novels, for instance?

One of the criteria that to me feels like it raises some questions is the “appropriateness of style of illustration to the story, theme or concept” one. In theory, it is valuable, and I particularly appreciate that it encourages the committee to look at the picture book as a whole (as opposed to just the illustrations). But what about the cases where the style of illustrations might be outside the mainstream culture, and the majority of the committee may have little or no knowledge of that culture? What happens then? And is it the criterion that needs to be addressed, or the makeup of the committees?

Sorry: lots of questions; not many answers. Those of you who have served on the Caldecott committee — did you find the criteria limiting, or freeing, or challenging, or all of the above? Everyone — are the criteria still allowing the “most distinguished American picture books for children” to be chosen each year?

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The Pilot and the Little Prince http://www.hbook.com/2014/09/blogs/calling-caldecott/pilot-little-prince/ http://www.hbook.com/2014/09/blogs/calling-caldecott/pilot-little-prince/#comments Wed, 24 Sep 2014 14:02:54 +0000 http://www.hbook.com/?p=41130 This is a hard post to write. I love Peter Sis’s work, and his latest book, The Pilot and the Little Prince, is getting lots of starred reviews, but I’m having trouble jumping on that bandwagon. Most of my issues with this book wouldn’t fly in a real Caldecott committee discussion. The art is gorgeous and […]

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sis pilot and the little prince The Pilot and the Little PrinceThis is a hard post to write. I love Peter Sis’s work, and his latest book, The Pilot and the Little Prince, is getting lots of starred reviews, but I’m having trouble jumping on that bandwagon.

Most of my issues with this book wouldn’t fly in a real Caldecott committee discussion. The art is gorgeous and thought-provoking, but I don’t love the text. As you know, the committee is only allowed to compare books to other titles published the same year. This one might stack up well against other 2014 picture book biographies, but I just don’t think it’s as good as Sis’s previous books.

Let me get the non-valid stuff over with in this paragraph so we can get on to what the committee would be talking about. The Pilot and the Little Prince follows a format very similar to The Tree of Life, Sis’s biography of Charles Darwin. But  Tree had a clear reason for its three distinct narrative threads and provided insight into what made Darwin tick. Pilot‘s structure is less clear and doesn’t go into much detail about who Saint-Exupery was on the inside. Given the title of this book, I was hoping to learn more about what led to his writing the extraordinary and mysterious Little Prince. Instead, I don’t feel as if I know Sis’s subject any better than I did after reading Saint-Exupery’s Wikipedia entry.

Phew, that’s done.

What the committee CAN discuss about this book is the art and how it works as a whole with the rest of the book’s elements. Sis never takes the easy path. His pointillist style allows him to include myriad small details and references. As a designer, I know how hard it is to put so many images and ideas together on one spread and end up with something balanced and harmonious rather than busy and dissonant.

For example, look at the first spread in the book. We see two small circles showing young Antoine: on the left he is in bed being read to by his mother and on the right he’s a bit older reading by himself. Surrounding these circles we see what he imagines as he absorbs these stories. How do we know that’s what we are seeing? The text doesn’t tell us that the central circles are fact and the surroundings are imagination. It reads, “It was an exciting time of discovery in the world. Things people had only dreamed about were being invented — including flying machines.”

There is a LOT going on in this spread, but the circles showing Antoine use cool colors surrounded with a nearly white background, egg-like. Everything else is warm: red, orange, yellow. There is so much to look at here. I see references to works by Jules Verne and early filmmaker George Melies, both active at the time of Saint-Exupery’s birth and likely to have fueled young Antoine’s interest in flying. There are lots of other references that undoubtedly mean something. I understand the elephant under the hat (from The Little Prince, of course), and Icarus, and the Pterodactyl. But what about the big face in the center that seems to be part of the land? It’s repeated later in a wordless spread after Antoine has started to fly. What does it mean? I like that this book is smarter than I am. There are so many reasons to keep looking and thinking.

I love nearly every visual choice Sis makes in this book. I would love to hear your theories about one choice that I don’t understand. Early in the book, Sis uses negative space to illustrate people in Saint-Exupery’s life who have died. We see his father, who died when he was four, as a white silhouette against a stark landscape and later see his brother and sister, who died in 1917 and 1926, the same way. So what does it mean when Saint-Exupery is shown as a large white silhouette against a map of Paris? Is this foreshadowing? But why on this particular spread? Or is it just a way of designing this spread that doesn’t have anything to do with the visual language he set up earlier?

I think the real committee is likely to spend a lot of time discussing this book. As it should. And as we should right now.

 

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Firefly July: A Year of Very Short Poems http://www.hbook.com/2014/09/blogs/calling-caldecott/firefly-july/ http://www.hbook.com/2014/09/blogs/calling-caldecott/firefly-july/#comments Mon, 22 Sep 2014 14:00:58 +0000 http://www.hbook.com/?p=41042 Before we start chatting about specific 2014 picture books, take a moment to read the Caldecott criteria. They’re posted over there on the right, but I will help you find the important parts. Here they are, in part: In identifying a “distinguished American picture book for children,” defined as illustration, committee members need to consider: […]

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Before we start chatting about specific 2014 picture books, take a moment to read the Caldecott criteria. They’re posted over there on the right, but I will help you find the important parts. Here they are, in part:

In identifying a “distinguished American picture book for children,” defined as illustration, committee members need to consider:
  1. Excellence of execution in the artistic technique employed;
  2. Excellence of pictorial interpretation of story, theme, or concept;
  3. Appropriateness of style of illustration to the story, theme or concept;
  4. Delineation of plot, theme, characters, setting, mood or information through the pictures;
  5. Excellence of presentation in recognition of a child audience.

Tattoo those categories onto the inside of your eyelids so you will understand why, when we talk about books, we stick to the same points over and over. We have to. The committee discusses all books in light of the published criteria, and the chair keeps everyone close to these five main ideas. 

janeczko firefly july2 Firefly July: A Year of Very Short Poems It’s tricky to start our discussion this year with a collection of poems, because it brings up the age-old question of whether this is a picture book or an illustrated book. I refer you to the definitions. Let’s just agree (for the moment, at least) that this fits the definition of a picture book as it is essentially a visual experience. Feel free to say otherwise in the comments. That’s just not where I want to go at the moment.

This handsome volume presents 8 to 10 poems per season and, just as the subtitle says (“A Year of Very Short Poems”), each poem is very short. This gives the volume a clear arc and allows the illustrations to gently explore how color and line might change over the course of a year, as the seasons unfold. The paper cover and the case cover are the same, and the endpapers are a lovely muted blue. Though I am generally a fan of flashy endpapers, it makes sense that these are calm, given the energy that illustrator Melissa Sweet brings to each spread.

Spring is the first season, and the first page is a celebration of spring things, including a robin, which I love. There are also daffodils and other early-spring bulbs blooming. The small poems march on, but it is the illustrations that hold them together. As we move to summer, the Langston Hughes poem “Subway Rush Hour” is made summery by the bouquet of daisies that accompanies it. Summer moves on and the colors change as the leaves fall. The transition is seamless; indeed, the divisions between the seasons are subtle and easy to miss, much like the artificial dates on the calendar that mark the change. By wintertime, the hues have completely changed–darkened by the lack of sun, yet whitened by the presence of snow.

Sweet’s art, a joyous combination of watercolor, gouache, and mixed-media collage, tells each poem’s story while allowing the young reader to consider each poem for herself. Her use of color and line build each illustration, sometimes joining two poems (such as” Fog” and “Uses for Fog”) together on a double-page spread, other times allowing the gutter to divide the scenes. The art is completely appropriate to the collection; indeed, it’s her illustrations that make these poems accessible to the child audience (and here the audience could be as young as 3 and as old as an appreciative adult). The mood is set by the illustrations, and Sweet does not bore the reader with trite homages to each season–she requires the reader to look deeper at each spread and think about the connection to the words.

I just looked up the part of the definitions about the term “distinguished,” and here that is:

  1. “Distinguished” is defined as:
    1. Marked by eminence and distinction; noted for significant achievement.
    2. Marked by excellence in quality.
    3. Marked by conspicuous excellence or eminence.
    4. Individually distinct.

Most of the books we will talk about this fall and winter are distinguished, and this one certainly is. Each spread is filled with emotion and care, with design meshing seamlessly with color and line. There are many places to look, but it never looks busy or overdone, as each page turn creates its own little world.

Though the real committee can (and will) compare this book to Sweet’s other 2014 title (The Right Word), I have found it difficult to do that in a single blog post. So, feel free to compare if you wish, but know that Martha will be talking about that one soon. For me, I cannot choose between these two very special books. Perhaps Sweet will “pull a Klassen” and receive two phone calls from Chicago in January.

 

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#we need diverse (picture) books http://www.hbook.com/2014/09/blogs/calling-caldecott/need-diverse-picture-books/ http://www.hbook.com/2014/09/blogs/calling-caldecott/need-diverse-picture-books/#comments Wed, 17 Sep 2014 14:00:39 +0000 http://www.hbook.com/?p=40862 Of course we do. Last year’s amazing crop of picture books included those illustrated by artists of color such as Yuyi Morales, Brian Pinkney, Jerry Pinkney, Angela Dominguez, Bryan Collier, Don Tate, and Kadir Nelson. This year we will see picture books illustrated by Christian Robinson (two of ‘em), Yuyi Morales, Raul Colon, Duncan Tonatiuh, Jason Chin, Susan […]

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little melba 300x248 #we need diverse (picture) booksOf course we do. Last year’s amazing crop of picture books included those illustrated by artists of color such as Yuyi Morales, Brian Pinkney, Jerry Pinkney, Angela Dominguez, Bryan Collier, Don Tate, and Kadir Nelson. This year we will see picture books illustrated by Christian Robinson (two of ‘em), Yuyi Morales, Raul Colon, Duncan Tonatiuh, Jason Chin, Susan Guevara, E.B. Lewis, Kadir Nelson, John Holyfield, Pat Cummings, James Ransome….and Christopher Myers and Frank Morrison….and more? I’m not even counting the many international artists who aren’t eligible for the Caldecott. (And my off-the-cuff list also doesn’t take into consideration books like Grandfather Gandhi, not illustrated by a person of color, but featuring diverse characters.)

I don’t know if it’s the raised awareness surrounding last spring’s #weneeddiversebooks campaign or whether in truth the numbers are growing, but it feels like there is a tiny bit more representation this year, at least among the books I’ve seen, and certainly among the ones that are currently rising toward the top of my admire-it pile: Josephine; Draw!; Viva Frida; Separate Is Never Equal; Little Roja Riding Hood. More women, more illustrators of color — although the numbers for that particular overlap are still insupportably low. And although, of course, we still have a lonnnng way to go.

It somehow feels too tentative to make any pronouncements. I think Sam Bloom summed up my cautious optimism in his comment on Robin’s Monday post:

“Of course, this brings me to the single biggest issue I see in the picture book world, which has definitely been publicized well of late: the need for more diverse characters. Of course, there are comparatively few authors/illustrators of color to begin with, another well-known fact. It seems to be getting a bit better – I’ve noticed quite a few REALLY strong books by or about people of color this year – but I wonder if it truly IS better, or maybe it’s just the fact that I’m paying close attention to the situation so it seems like more.”

What are you seeing? Are you sensing some movement toward more diversity in this year’s picture books? Does anyone have any numbers to back up (or refute) my admittedly highly anecdotal experience? Equally crucially — is the actual Caldecott committee noticing the strength and award-worthiness of these titles?

 

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Now you know what we think http://www.hbook.com/2014/09/blogs/calling-caldecott/now-know-think/ http://www.hbook.com/2014/09/blogs/calling-caldecott/now-know-think/#comments Mon, 15 Sep 2014 14:00:08 +0000 http://www.hbook.com/?p=40821 So, now you know where the three of us are in September. I wonder where we will be in January? Now that Lolly, Martha, and I know one another’s favorites, we will put our schedule together and start yapping about books soon. Go through our three lists here, here and here if you want a hint […]

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So, now you know where the three of us are in September.

I wonder where we will be in January? Now that Lolly, Martha, and I know one another’s favorites, we will put our schedule together and start yapping about books soon. Go through our three lists here, here and here if you want a hint as to which books we are likely to discuss in the coming months. There will be many more, of course, as new books are published right through November and December; these will all be considered by the real committee, and we don’t want to miss a thing. We are going to do our best NOT to talk about books until you can actually find them in bookstores. (Speaking of bookstores — if you are lucky enough to have a local one, get your tush to that store and buy some of these titles! Your library will have a lot of them, but October and November books are going to be tough to find there.)

We have combed the comments so far and will discuss some of the books you guys have suggested, though we will never be able to discuss all of them. So, take a day or two to keep the suggestions coming! It’s especially helpful if you add a sentence or two to explain why you think a particular title should end up with a shiny sticker in January.

Besides talking about individual titles, we will also be discussing issues we see in the picture book world. Is there an issue or concern stuck in your craw that you want us to tackle? Make that suggestion in the comments as well. We do like to talk about Serious Picture Book Issues, but we don’t always know what issues concern you most.

So make suggestions, and we will shuffle our papers, toss the dice, and get chatting about Caldecott possibilities.

And just to add an air of panic to my fear of missing something, here is a list from HuffPo. There are titles I haven’t even heard of!

 

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Early days yet http://www.hbook.com/2014/09/blogs/early-days/ http://www.hbook.com/2014/09/blogs/early-days/#comments Fri, 12 Sep 2014 14:00:20 +0000 http://www.hbook.com/?p=40644 Hello! Welcome back to all you Calling Caldecott devotees — and welcome to those here for the first time this fall. This is the final post of a week in which Robin, Lolly, and I are making preliminary lists of the picture books eligible for Caldecott recognition that have, early in the process, struck a chord with each of us. Perhaps a book looks like […]

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iridescence 246x300 Early days yetHello! Welcome back to all you Calling Caldecott devotees — and welcome to those here for the first time this fall. This is the final post of a week in which Robin, Lolly, and I are making preliminary lists of the picture books eligible for Caldecott recognition that have, early in the process, struck a chord with each of us. Perhaps a book looks like a definite contender; perhaps it presents something of significance to discuss; perhaps it’s simply a book one of us has fallen in love with. I’m sure you all have seen 2014 picture books that fall into one of those categories! And we hope to hear what they are. (Thanks for all the comments and suggestions so far.)

It’s not surprising that we haven’t listed all the same books; it’s also not surprising that there is substantial overlap. The same thing is likely happening with the actual Caldecott committee, as the members share their own suggestions for potential contenders.

So without further ado, here are some of the books that have caught my eye, my attention, and/or my love icon smile Early days yet so far:

The Farmer and the Clown (Beach Lane) by Marla Frazee. Yes, there is a lot of love for this book in the office, and for good reason. It’s a wordless book with a emotionally resonant story; significant character development; brilliant use of page turns to tell the story and show the passage of time — all achieved solely through pictures.

The Right Word: Roget and His Thesaurus (Eerdmans), illustrated by Melissa Sweet, written by Jen Bryant. In complete contrast: all about words; so many words organically incorporated into Sweet’s controlled-chaos collage illustrations. (Will someone on the committee feel the need to count them all? if so good luck!)

Josephine: The Dazzling Life of Josephine Baker (Chronicle) illustrated by Christian Robinson, written by Patricia Hruby Powell. A perfect marriage of form and content (ie, it’s dazzling on every level).

Viva Frida (Porter/Roaring Brook) illustrated and written by Yuyi Morales. A wholly original and daring distillation of the creative process; I can’t wait to hear what you all have to say about it.

Draw! (Simon) illustrated by Raul Colon. Very different in setting, palette, and style from last year’s honor book Journey, yet with intriguing similarities.

Winter Bees and Other Poems of the Cold (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt) illustrated by Rick Allen, written by Joyce Sidman. Here it’s a toss-up as to which is stronger, the text or the art; take your pick.

The Iridescence of Birds: A Book about Henri Matisse (Porter/Roaring Brook) illustrated by Hadley Hooper, written by Patricia MacLachlan. The transformative power of art, made manifest; I love how the art captures the essence of, but doesn’t try to reproduce, Matisse’s work.

Sam and Dave Dig a Hole (Candlewick) illustrated by Jon Klassen, written by Mac Barnett. A true picture book (text and art working together interdependently) with sustained humor and enormous child appeal.

SUCH a preliminary list. From now on I’ll be busy tracking down the suggestions of my fellow Calling Caldecott bloggers and commenters: discovering new books, adding to the list, comparing and re-weighing and perhaps taking books off the list — just like the actual committee.

 

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Taking stock http://www.hbook.com/2014/09/blogs/calling-caldecott/taking-stock/ http://www.hbook.com/2014/09/blogs/calling-caldecott/taking-stock/#comments Wed, 10 Sep 2014 14:00:20 +0000 http://www.hbook.com/?p=40529 Now it’s my turn, and I find myself not quite as ready as I’d like to be. My job here involves looking at every picture book we review in search of the perfect art with which to illustrate the review. This means I have leafed through lots of books but only spent quality time with the […]

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Now it’s my turn, and I find myself not quite as ready as I’d like to be. My job here involves looking at every picture book we review in search of the perfect art with which to illustrate the review. This means I have leafed through lots of books but only spent quality time with the ones I reviewed myself, plus a few more that caught my eye at the time.

So my list today is fairly short, but I expect it to grow in the next few weeks as we all start discussing titles.

Starting at the top, I have a hunch these two books will be on our final ballot:

  • Josephine: The Dazzling Life of Josephine Baker, written by Patricia Hruby Powell and illustrated by Christian Robinson (The art is jazzy, tactile, and grounded. Robinson is a new illustrator to watch.)
  • Viva Frida, written and illustrated by Yuyi Morales (Just wow. Can’t wait to talk about this one.)

CC robinson twobooks 500x281 Taking stock

These are both picture-book biographies, which tend to present extra challenges since they need to get the facts right while keeping everything visually interesting. But also, the art style needs to reflect the essence of the person the book is about. If the author isn’t going to illustrate the book, it’s up to the editor to choose someone with just the right vibe. I won’t name titles here, but there are a number of well-received picture book biographies with good text and good illustrations that don’t quite work together to illuminate the spirit of their subject.

*Ooof* <– That’s me stepping off the soapbox and getting back on track.

This year doesn’t feel quite as rich in picture book greatness as 2013, but then we still have a few more months. Publishers sometimes time their best books to come out late in the year. Other books I’m eager to discuss here are:

  • Draw! by Raúl Colón (it’s about time for this guy to win the Medal!)
  • Elizabeth, Queen of the Seas by Lynne Cox, illustrated by Brian Floca (last year’s winner gets on my list by default, even if the new book isn’t as good — but this one is a real charmer)
  • The Farmer and the Clown by Marla Frazee (getting lots of buzz here in the office)
  • Buried Sunlight by Penny Chisholm and Molly Bang, illustrated by Molly Bang (admittedly a long shot, but I want us to discuss it)
  • Firefly July: A Year of Very Short Poems selected by Paul Janeczko, illustrated by Melissa Sweet (of course!)
  • Gaston by Kelly DiPucchio, illustrated by Christian Robinson (another title from newcomer-to-watch Robinson)
  • My Bus by Byron Barton (can a book so simple win?)

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Getting to the top shelf http://www.hbook.com/2014/09/blogs/calling-caldecott/getting-top-shelf/ http://www.hbook.com/2014/09/blogs/calling-caldecott/getting-top-shelf/#comments Mon, 08 Sep 2014 14:00:39 +0000 http://www.hbook.com/?p=40572 Here is the truth of the matter: in less than three months, each individual Caldecott committee member will nominate seven books out of the hundreds he or she has seen this year. It’s kind of a sickening task: either you appreciate SO MANY that you have trouble cutting any out, or you really only have […]

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IMG 4044 225x300 Getting to the top shelfHere is the truth of the matter: in less than three months, each individual Caldecott committee member will nominate seven books out of the hundreds he or she has seen this year. It’s kind of a sickening task: either you appreciate SO MANY that you have trouble cutting any out, or you really only have found a few that make your heart go pitter-patter. I won’t say what kind of year I am having with the 2014 books,  but I am going to limit myself to seven right now. I always fear that I will overwhelm others if I name too many. In no particular order, here are the seven that are on my top shelf right now, either because they really wow me or because I am intrigued by them and want to hear further discussion. (Because I live in mortal fear of Missing Something, I must say that I am waiting on a few books right now, including The Iridescence of Birds, A Letter for Leo, and Nana in the City. I know there are many more to come, so I am clearly hedging my bets here.) (And don’t try to figure out what is on the tiny shelf adjacent to my dining table. It’s one of many shelves, incomprehensible even to me.)

The Right Word: Roget and His Thesaurus (illustrated by Melissa Sweet, written by Jen Bryant)

Separate Is Never Equal (by Duncan Tontatiuh)

Hug Machine (by Scott Campbell)

All Different Now: Juneteenth, the First Day of Freedom (illustrated by E.B. Lewis, written by Angela Johnson)

The Farmer and the Clown (by Marla Frazee)

Gaston (illustrated by Christian Robinson, written by Kelly DiPucchio)

Kid Sheriff and the Terrible Toads (illustrated by Lane Smith, written by Bob Shea)

I can’t wait to see what Lolly and Martha have in mind right now. Of course our minds will change many, many times over the next few months. I look forward to the roller coaster.

 

 

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Dusting off the blog http://www.hbook.com/2014/09/blogs/calling-caldecott/dusting-blog/ http://www.hbook.com/2014/09/blogs/calling-caldecott/dusting-blog/#comments Thu, 04 Sep 2014 14:00:40 +0000 http://www.hbook.com/?p=40402 School has started, and you know what that means…yup, we’re baaaack! For me, it means my second graders are getting in the groove, and now it’s time for me to relearn WordPress and try to twist Lolly’s arm for amusing graphics to brighten up the blog. Lolly Robinson, Martha Parravano, and I are going through our […]

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callingcaldecott featherduster 271x288 Dusting off the blogSchool has started, and you know what that means…yup, we’re baaaack! For me, it means my second graders are getting in the groove, and now it’s time for me to relearn WordPress and try to twist Lolly’s arm for amusing graphics to brighten up the blog.

Lolly Robinson, Martha Parravano, and I are going through our stacks of picture books, reading reviews, and trying to figure out a thing or two. First, what in the world is going to win the Caldecott Award this year? Second, how can we get into the hearts and minds of the committee members and figure out how they are managing the boxes of books that are currently invading their homes and taking over every available space?

Here’s how it’s going to go down this year. Pay attention: we are Changing Things Up a bit.

First, each of us is going to post very briefly about what we are seeing that we like. We are not going to put together a definitive list quite yet. Then, what we want from you, smart readers and people of strong opinions, are your suggestions. Tell us what you are loving and why you think the real committee will love your choices as well. We will be reading the comments closely. Lolly, Martha, and I will have a little chat (yes, it’s Project Runway season again!) and proceed from there.

In addition, we will be addressing some issues that we have been thinking about over the last few months, and we’d be happy to know if there is anything you are burning to talk about with us. For example, I know we will be talking about diversity in picture books, the wealth of books from other countries, and the dearth of longer story books. There is a lot more to consider, so chime in with ideas you might like to discuss with us.

We will start writing about specific books in week or so.

Check back in frequently to see which books we think will make some noise in January.

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Mr. Tiger love at last! http://www.hbook.com/2014/06/blogs/lollys-classroom/mr-tiger-love-last/ http://www.hbook.com/2014/06/blogs/lollys-classroom/mr-tiger-love-last/#comments Mon, 02 Jun 2014 14:01:59 +0000 http://www.hbook.com/?p=38080 Readers of Calling Caldecott — and all my students — will understand my joy at hearing the Boston Globe–Horn Book Awards announced Saturday. FINALLY some award love for Mr. Tiger Goes Wild! You can read the press release and reviews of the winning books here. We’ll put up photos from the announcement soon and you […]

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brown mr tiger goes wild Mr. Tiger love at last!Readers of Calling Caldecott — and all my students — will understand my joy at hearing the Boston Globe–Horn Book Awards announced Saturday. FINALLY some award love for Mr. Tiger Goes Wild!

You can read the press release and reviews of the winning books here. We’ll put up photos from the announcement soon and you can read the tweets here.

Being on the BGHB committee is a unique experience. The judges are responsible for knowing about ALL the children’s books published in a 12-month period, not just picture books or fiction or nonfiction as with the ALA awards. But at the same time, the three-person committee streamlines the process and allows for email discussions and sitting-in-someone’s-living-room discussions that just don’t work with a 15-member committee. Congratulations to judges Nina Lindsay, Claire Gross, and Amy Pattee. Well done!

I hope you will all check out these books and read them over the next few months if you haven’t already. And you should STRONGLY consider coming to the Horn Book at Simmons colloquium in the fall. It’s a one-day conference the day after the BGHB awards and always features the winners and the award judges. Since we only just learned who won, Katrina and Roger are still working on the details, but you can save the date now: October 11, 2014. Here’s a link to last year’s program to give you a general idea. As you can see, it’s a great conference for working teachers — and anyone who loves children’s books.

HBAS Mr. Tiger love at last!

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