>Yes, I do want fries with that.

>Galleycat links to a thoughtfully cranky piece about booksellers who pat themselves on the back for selling “banned” books such as Huckleberry Finn while simultaneously refusing to sell Tintin in the Congo: Providing unencumbered access to the literary works created under the auspices of free speech (all of ‘em — not just the ones we […]

>Throw the book at her?

>Librarian Kristin Peto of Maine sent me the story about the woman, JoAnn Karkos, who checked out two copies of It’s Perfectly Normal (a 1995 Boston Globe-Horn Book Honor awardee, so you know where we stand) from Maine libraries and is declining to return them, sending checks for $20.95 (I’m guessing the price on the […]

>Why we ‘see’ movies and ‘watch’ TV

>Watching the Emmys last night (and was Sally Field cut off because she spoke out against the war or because she said “goddamn”?) I idly queried why the Oscars have more prestige and glamor when more people watch more TV than they do movies. Richard had a ready, comprehensive answer: in an impulse hearkening back […]

>It’s Her Party

>Anne Fine offers a personal take on the Tintin in the Congo controversy, citing examples from her own work where she has revised lines to better speak to contemporary sensibilities and her own raised consciousness. P.L. Travers, you will recall, did the same with Mary Poppins, replacing the racial representatives of the “Bad Tuesday” chapter […]

>It was an itsy-bitsy, teeny-weeny . . .

>Galleycat reports on the news that Boyds Mills Press has backed out of negotiations to publish a picture book series by German artist Rotraut Susanne Berner after the author refused to change two pictures that displayed nudity, both small representations of artwork displayed in a museum. Oh, the horror, oh, the censorship, oh these self-righteous […]

>"Mad Bitches Against Gay People"

>Here‘s an interesting story about censorship and the upcoming publication of And Tango Makes Three in the U.K. I’m refreshed by Mel Burgess’s suggestion that censorship furor is often more a fact of media exploitation than it is a reflection of the actual fortunes of a book. For the record, here’s what the Horn Book […]

>Maybe this is what Susan Patron was thinking.

>In his powerful new picture book memoir The Wall (Frances Foster/FSG, forthcoming in September), Peter Śís quotes from his journals about the darkness following the Prague Spring of 1968: There is a whole science to learn about dealing with censors. You have to give them something to change. For instance, if you’re making a film […]

>When the Isms Really Need to Sit Down and Talk

>The blog Prometheus 6 led me to this story in the LA Times about two teachers fired for supporting students who wanted to read from Marilyn Nelson’s A Wreath for Emmett Till at an assembly honoring Black History Month: Teachers and students said the administration suggested that the Till case — in which the teenager […]

>Second verse, same as the first

>A commenter asked yesterday on the blog about the news that the Hamas government has banned a book of Palestinian folktales, Speak, Bird, Speak Again, from West Bank schools because of sexual references. And this is different from U.S. schools banning It’s Perfectly Normal or The Higher Power of Lucky because . . . ?

>From the Man Who Did This Already, Already

>Did anyone catch the shoutout to Maurice Sendak on The L Word this week? He didn’t, but allowed to me this morning that Jennifer Beals nekkid would definitely be worth drawing (I’m not being gratuitous; see the recap). In any event, he was far more worked up about Susan Patron’s problems with a few librarians, […]