>July/August Horn Book Magazine

>Get your collector’s edition now! While the limitations of technology (and the absence of a thrilling soundtrack and a screaming crowd) means that the tour de force with which Brian Selznick opened his Caldecott speech won’t have quite the same effect on paper, those same images can still be yours for as long as the […]

>Is long the new short?

>I just picked up Katherine Applegate’s Beach Blondes: A Summer Novel (Simon Pulse) and boy are my arms tired. This sucker is 721 paperback pages long, and first in a series to boot. I’m guessing it’s so fat for some strategic marketing reason, or perhaps I just haven’t yet gotten to the chapter “This Is […]

>It’s not a word to throw around lightly

>Poets are supposed to choose their words very carefully. This one doesn’t. But a poet standing up to a bookstore does demonstrate chutzpah, I’ll give her that. Thanks to Shelf Awareness for the link.

>Code Pink

>Scanning the multitudes of new books throughout the office, I am struck–again–by the endurance of pink covers on light teen girl fiction. I know this is nothing new; what interests me is the fact that I wrote about this four years ago, and I’m surprised it still works–not the chicklit formula, which is eternal, but […]

>My favorite new reviewing word,

>from Publishers Weekly‘s 3/3/08 review of Penny Vincenzi’s (love her) An Absolute Scandal: “chickensian.”

>February Web Watch

>Zoe has been poking around again.

>Going down a dark hall

>I’d like to second Elizabeth’s hopes (see comments in Monday’s post) for a Gothic revival. I’ve just finished listening to Jamaica Inn by Daphne Du Maurier, narrated by Tony Britton. When I told friends I was reading it, to a woman they started talking about their adolescent (around 10 up, I think) mania for Du […]

>It’s better than the hanky code!

>These are brilliant. Hey, Leila: does this come in H-E-N-R-Y and R-I-B-S-Y?

>Oh, Santa, Please, Please, Please!

> I told you Martha and I were writing a book, but apparently somebody, um, beat us to it. More than a century ago.

>Meg Cabot as Alistair Cooke

>Meg Cabot brings an American classic to life.