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Archives for May 2010

>Euwwww, used e-books

>Amazon’s practice of keeping track of what you underline is not only creepy, it’s disgusting. There I was, happily beginning Herman Wouk’s The Winds of War on my iPod Touch’s Kindle reader (all in all a nifty piece of software) when I came upon this: To hear Rhoda Henry’s daily chatter, her life passed in […]

>Monday Diary

>Anita Lobel was great and glamorous for her Zena Sutherland Lecture last Friday night in Chicago, and we will be bringing you that speech in an upcoming issue. Thank goodness for our full-color printing as Anita Lobel paints the most beautiful colors I know and Lolly should be in pig(ment) heaven choosing illustrations. Thanks again […]

>Food and Art

>Tomorrow’s Sutherland Lecturer tells a story. And I know she has many more to tell, so come on down to the Harold Washington Library in Chicago tomorrow night to hear them.

>Book plot #2

>I offer this one to Andrew Clements. Or the next Andrew Clements. The protagonist would be this guy‘s grandson. Ron Koertge can have it, if you make it this guy’s only grandson, and he’s blind.

>We have liftoff

> and I’ll be signing at BEA if you’re in the neighborhood.

>Why isn’t there a license to bear children?

>Dan Gutman’s analysis of a not-a-fan letter reminds me of the odd irony that non-readers ascribe to books a degree of power that actual readers can only wish books had. (On a related note, one of our reviewers let us know that “ugly” is now a no-no word. That’s stupid. See what I did?)

>May/June Magazine

>The new issue of the Horn Book Magazine is out, and selected articles are up on our website, including “YA: Why So Big and Stupid?” and “Meat Is Murder.” I paraphrase.

Review of Countdown

Countdown [The Sixties Trilogy] by Deborah Wiles Intermediate     Scholastic     394 pp. 5/10     978-0-545-10605-4     $17.99     g Even the weakest history student knows that the world didn’t end during the Cuban Missile Crisis of 1962, yet it can be hard to shrug off the old-time geopolitical jitters in this first-rate novel — especially when its eye-grabbing graphic […]

Eating Reading Animals

by Jennifer Armstrong The children’s book industry is as full of animals as Noah’s Ark. I found a list of the 150 all-time best-selling hardcover children’s books tabulated as of the end of 2000; fifty-two of them are explicitly “animal books” — books that are about animals or that feature animals as main characters — […]

Generosity: What I Learned from Doreen Rappaport

Doreen Rappaport has given me my entire arsenal of Yiddish terms and helped clarify whether mensch was a compliment or an insult. Doreen has taught me, in a number of knee-quaking moments, that people can disagree vehemently — even profanely — yet still maintain a deep mutual affection for each other. She’s taught me that, […]