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Refugees and immigrants

Currie, Stephen  Undocumented Immigrant Youth
Middle school, high school     80 pp.     ReferencePoint

Forgotten Youth series. Currie describes the experiences of children who come to America illegally, either with or without their parents. Using statistics and first-person accounts, the presentation documents the difficulties encountered, including fear of detection and deportation, problems involving detention centers, and factors relating to teenagers (e.g., going to college). Photographs and sidebars are included on otherwise text-heavy pages. Helpful organizations’ contact information is included. Reading list, websites. Ind.
Subjects: Immigration; Undocumented immigrants; Children

Glynne, Andy  Ali’s Story: A Real-Life Account of His Journey from Afghanistan
Illustrated by Salvador Maldonado.
Gr. K–3     32 pp.     Capstone/Picture Window

Glynne, Andy  Juliane’s Story: A Real-Life Account of Her Journey from Zimbabwe
Illustrated by Karl Hammond.
Gr. K–3     32 pp.     Capstone/Picture Window

Seeking Refuge series. Each book offers a first-person account of a refugee child’s separation from family due to hardship or war: Ali leaves Afghanistan with his grandma as his parents stay behind, while Juliane endures a painful separation from her mother in Zimbabwe before they leave the country together. Despite the sometimes disjointed digital images, simple storytelling makes these texts relatable to young readers.
Subjects: Immigration; Refugees; Family—Mother and daughter; Orphans; Zimbabwe; Women—Refugees; Family—Parent and child; Family—Grandmothers; Afghanistan; War; Refugees

Henzel, Cynthia Kennedy  Mexican Immigrants: In Their Shoes
Gr. 4–6, middle school     32 pp.     Child’s

Hutchison, Patricia  Somali Immigrants: In Their Shoes
Gr. 4–6, middle school     32 pp.     Child’s

MacCarald, Clara  Japanese Immigrants: In Their Shoes
Gr. 4–6, middle school     32 pp.     Child’s

Monnig, Alex  German Immigrants: In Their Shoes
Gr. 4–6, middle school     32 pp.     Child’s

Immigrant Experiences series. This series provides general glimpses into many immigrant groups’ struggles in the U.S. Each book’s vignettes (with direct quotes) on real immigrants striving for citizenship and acceptance in America add intimacy and impact to the presentation; frank discussions of discrimination are included. Photographs extend the narratives. There are four other fall 2017 books in this series. Reading list, timeline. Glos., ind.
Subjects: Immigration; Germany; Prejudices; German Americans; Mexico; Mexican Americans; Somali Americans; Refugees; Somalia; Japanese Americans; Japan

McCarney, Rosemary  Where Will I Live?
Gr. K–3, 4–6     24 pp.     Second Story

Haunting photos of refugee children and adults in different countries (identified in tiny print) and situations pair with spare text that reflects these children’s concerns; in the last image, a child in Niger looks straight at the young reader and says, “I hope someone smiles and says ‘Welcome home.’ I hope that someone is you.” A powerful introduction to the world’s refugee crisis.
Subjects: Immigration; Refugees; Children

Roberts, Ceri  Refugees and Migrants
Gr. K–3, 4–6     32 pp.     Barron’s

Illustrated by Hanane Kai. Children in Our World series. Using relatable language and explanations, this volume sensitively explores the plight of refugees and migrants. The coverage includes why and how people leave their home countries, refugee camps, asylum seekers, and the complicated process of determining where a refugee will ultimately live; suggestions for how to help are also provided. Kai’s muted, reassuring illustrations enhance the lucid prose. Reading list, websites. Glos., ind.
Subjects: Immigration; Emotions—Empathy; Refugees; Charities

From the May 2018 issue of Nonfiction Notes from the Horn Book.

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