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Sustainable eating

Archer, Joe and Craig, Caroline  Plant, Cook, Eat!: A Children’s Cookbook
Gr. 4–6
     112 pp.     Charlesbridge

Archer and Craig provide an overview of different plant food sources (including roots, leaves, flowers, and stems) and then, with an emphasis on the process, explain how to grow and cook them yourself. Readers are encouraged to try new foods and techniques with sixteen colorful fruits and vegetables. Novel recipes include chocolate beet cake and zucchini and polenta fries. Glos., ind.
Subjects: Cookery and Nutrition; Vegetarianism; Fruits and vegetables; Gardens and gardening

Cornell, Kari  Dig In!: 12 Easy Gardening Projects Using Kitchen Scraps
Gr. 4–6
     64 pp.     Millbrook

Photographs by Jennifer S. Larson. An introduction includes information on plant growth, North American hardiness zones, soil pH, pollination, and supplies. Each of the four chapters that follow group projects by growing method (from seeds, cuttings, etc.) and include one or two recipes for the resulting vegetable, herb, or fruit. Plentiful bright, close-up photos illustrate the step-by-step directions. Reading list, websites. Glos., ind.
Subjects: Farm Life, Husbandry, and Gardening; Food; Cookery

Mihaly, Christy and Heavenrich, Sue  Diet for a Changing Climate: Food for Thought
Middle school, high school     128 pp.     Twenty-First Century

Ten chapters urge readers to expand their food choices to help ameliorate the interrelated issues of climate change and global hunger. Suggestions — most already enjoyed by humans in many parts of the world — include protein-rich, sustainably raised insects (crickets, grubs); local wild plants and “weeds” (dandelions, kudzu); and invasive animal species (periwinkles, nutria). Full-color photos, recipes, nutritional charts, and “grow your own grubs” instructions are included. Reading list, websites. Bib., glos., ind.
Subjects: Cookery and Nutrition; Pests; Food; Environment—Conservation; Climate change; Food relief

Ritchie, Scot  See What We Eat!: A First Book of Healthy Eating
Gr. K–3     32 pp.     Kids Can

In this informational picture book, five friends decide to make apple crisp to serve at their community’s harvest potluck. Over the course of the story, the kids learn about nutritional groups, foods from each that a farm provides, and how foods get to warehouses and grocery stores. Bright digital illustrations show a diverse collection of kid chefs enjoying a sunny day and a shared meal. A recipe is appended. Glos.
Subjects: Cookery and Nutrition; Agriculture; Farms and farm life; Food; Fruits and vegetables—Apples

Veness, Kimberley  Let’s Eat!: Sustainable Food for a Hungry Planet
Gr. 4–6
     48 pp.     Orca

Orca Footprints series. With a focus on sustainability, four chapters examine farming across the globe, including new technologies such as robotic pollinating bees and the innovative use of an abandoned bomb shelter below London to grow greens. Well-captioned photos, including some of the author and her family growing up on a farm in Canada, illustrate the accessible text. Reading list, websites. Glos., ind.
Subjects: Farm Life, Husbandry, and Gardening; Environment—Conservation; Food; Agriculture

From the May 2019 issue of Nonfiction Notes from the Horn Book.

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Comments

  1. Wonderful selection of timely PBs that tackle the problem of the food cycle, sustainability, and some interesting and doable alternatives to our diets as they stand now. I was just thinking about this subject, and so to find these books makes my heart swell, as well as realize that this is the next topic for a great educational song! Thanks for the ideas! Keep putting out important books everyone!✌🏼💁🏼🎶🎨📚😊

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