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Review of We Are Still Here!: Native American Truths Everyone Should Know

We Are Still Here!: Native American Truths Everyone Should Know by Traci Sorell; illus. by Frané Lessac Primary, Intermediate    Charlesbridge    40 pp.    g 4/21    978-1-62354-192-7    $17.99 e-book ed.  978-1-63289-973-6    $9.99 In this informational picture book by the team behind We Are Grateful: Otsaliheliga (rev. 11/18), a diverse group of students...
      

More Than a Footnote: Challenges for BIPOC Nonfiction Authors

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For as long as I can remember, I have had three loves: jazz, poetry, and history. Those passions merged in my 2000 nonfiction title The Sound That Jazz Makes — a manuscript that was rejected more than a dozen times. The book’s first review was so negative that I cried....
      

Review of Indian No More

Indian No More by Charlene Willing McManis with Traci Sorell Intermediate    Tu/Lee & Low    209 pp.    g 9/19    978-1-62014-839-6    $18.95 This novel (based on McManis's childhood) is set against the background of U.S. government actions beginning in the 1940s that terminated the status of many Native Nations and forced relocation of families living on reservations. With a stroke of the pen, in 1954, eight-year-old Regina Petit...
      

We Are Grateful: Author Traci Sorell and Illustrator Frané Lessac's 2019 BGHB Picture Book Honor Speech

TRACI SORELL: Some books seem to make their way in the world even if there wasn’t a clear intention to do so at the beginning. Such is the case with We Are Grateful: Otsaliheliga. I had written a few contemporary picture-book manuscripts featuring Cherokee children and culture before I penned this one....
      

Five questions for Traci Sorell and Frané Lessac

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We Are Grateful: Otsaliheliga by Traci Sorell, illustrated by Frané Lessac (Charlesbridge, 5–8 years), is a lushly illustrated, through-the-seasons look at a contemporary Cherokee community's daily life, pausing for celebrations of traditional observances (e.g., Cherokee New Year) and making special note of gratitude.1. "Cherokee people say otsaliheliga to express gratitude....

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