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Julie Danielson

About Julie Danielson

Julie Danielson writes about picture books at the blog Seven Impossible Things Before Breakfast. She also writes for Kirkus Reviews and BookPage and is a lecturer for the School of Information Sciences graduate program at the University of Tennessee. Her book Wild Things!: Acts of Mischief in Children’s Literature, written with Betsy Bird and Peter D. Sieruta, was published in 2014.

Calling Caldecott: Not a Crystal Ball

We mentioned this in yesterday’s post, but it’s worth repeating: our mock vote yesterday was really close! WOWZERS. (You can head here to see the results if you haven’t seen the numbers yet.) As we watched the results come in yesterday, we were oohing and aahing over how close it was, especially between the top […]

2019 Calling Caldecott ballot #1 and voting instructions

It’s time for the 2019 mock vote here at Calling Caldecott! We have been discussing books here at the blog as far back as early March, and we hope you all have been reading and thinking and poring over books. The actual ALA Youth Media Awards will be in less than two weeks, but it’s […]

A Home in the Barn

Could Jerry Pinkney bring home Caldecott gold once again with his illustrations for A Home in the Barn? I don’t have a crystal ball, and even Santa (who knows everything) won’t tell me. But I do love this book. As we’ve seen, there are many stellar picture books this year. Could this one rise to […]

Dreamers

Martha referred to 2018 (back in this post) as a “year of blockbusters,” and Yuyi Morales’s Dreamers may be the biggest blockbuster of them all. It’s a picture book that has gotten a lot of attention and adoration this year (one professional review calls it nothing less than a “masterpiece”) and is, in fact, already […]

Nothing Stopped Sophie

Nothing Stopped Sophie: The Story of Unshakable Mathematician Sophie Germain (written by Cheryl Bardoe) is the story of the groundbreaking self-taught mathematician and physics pioneer Sophie Germain, whose work on the concept of vibration patterns made her the first woman to win a grand prize from France’s distinguished Royal Academy of Sciences. It’s a truly […]

The 2018 New York Times/New York Public Library Best Illustrated Children’s Books list

Did you all see on Friday the 2018 New York Times/New York Public Library Best Illustrated Children’s Books list? I’ve said this before, but the announcement of this award, along with the return to hot cocoa and turning the clocks back an hour, is one of my favorite things about fall. This year’s winners are: Dreamers, […]

Martin Rising

This year marks the fiftieth anniversary of the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. While we normally see, on an annual basis, a new crop of picture books about the legendary civil rights leader, there seem to be even more this year in an effort to mark this somber anniversary. Andrea Davis Pinkney’s Martin […]

Kidlitwomen*: A Conversation with Karen Blumenthal

Following her interview with last year’s Caldecott winner, Matthew Cordell, Julie Danielson interviewed author Karen Blumenthal by email for Calling Caldecott to discuss Kidlitwomen*, which Karen co-founded with author-illustrator Grace Lin. Calling Caldecott: Tell us about the origins of Kidlitwomen*. For those not familiar with the project, can you talk about when and why you and Grace […]

A Conversation with Matthew Cordell

Matthew Cordell is the author-illustrator of Wolf in the Snow, winner of the 2018 Randolph Caldecott Medal. Julie Danielson interviewed him by email for Calling Caldecott. Calling Caldecott: Hi, Matt! Before we kick off the new Caldecott season in earnest, we thought it’d be fun to have a brief chat (a Matt-chat, if you will) about what […]

Review of A Home in the Barn

A Home in the Barn by Margaret Wise Brown; illus. by Jerry Pinkney Preschool, Primary    Harper/HarperCollins    32 pp. 9/18    978-0-06-623787-9    $17.99 This cozy (previously unpublished) story from the late, legendary Margaret Wise Brown opens and closes with the same playful rhyme: “Here is the barn / Hear the wind rattle / Open the door / And see all […]