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Megan Dowd Lambert

About Megan Dowd Lambert

Megan Dowd Lambert is an instructor at Simmons College’s Center for the Study of Children’s Literature. For nearly ten years she also worked in the education department of the Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art.

Review of Jerome by Heart

Jerome by Heart by Thomas Scotto; illus. by Olivier Tallec; trans. from the French by Claudia Zoe Bedrick and Karin Snelson Primary    Enchanted Lion    32 pp. 4/18    978-1-59270-250-3    $16.95 Scotto and Tallec present a bittersweet story of an affectionate bond between two little boys. Raphael is the narrator, Jerome is his friend, and their friendship […]

Crossing bridges, turning pages

Mothering my seven children often inspires my writing, but I’ve made it a policy to avoid writing publicly about specific struggles I have with them. Growing up is hard enough, and I worry that real openness could amount to betrayal or worse. All to say: I have a story to tell about one of my […]

Review of Alma and How She Got Her Name

Alma and How She Got Her Name by Juana Martinez-Neal; illus. by the author Preschool, Primary    Candlewick    32 pp.    g 4/18    978-0-7636-9355-8    $15.99 Spanish ed.  978-0-7636-9358-9    $15.99 Alma Sofia Esperanza José Pura Candela feels self-conscious about her long name until her father tells her about the family members she is named after. Use of the […]

The Book of Mistakes

Less a story than a book about an idea, the central message of Corinna Luyken’s debut, The Book of Mistakes, appears as paratextual coda on the back of the jacket: “Set your imagination free.” According to Caldecott criteria, the Caldecott is “not for didactic intent,” but Luyken delivers her message as a masterful celebration of […]

Review of Why Am I Me?

Why Am I Me? by Paige Britt; illus. by Sean Qualls and Selina Alko Preschool    Scholastic    40 pp.    g 9/17    978-1-338-05314-2    $17.99 A boy and a girl of different skin colors board the same subway car as it travels through a city. As their gazes meet, each child seems to be quietly pondering questions posed […]

BGHB at 50: Seeing the Grey: Reading Molly Bang’s The Grey Lady and the Strawberry Snatcher with Children

I served on the 2012 Boston Globe–Horn Book Awards committee with Thom Barthelmess and Lauren Adams, and I wrote about my kids’ responses to our selections here. So when the Horn Book editors issued an invitation to reflect on past winners and honorees for BGHB’s fiftieth anniversary, I decided to branch out from my committee’s […]

A New Place You’ll Go: Opening Day at The Amazing World of Dr. Seuss Museum

The tagline for the Random House Beginner Book imprint reads “I Can Read It All By Myself” and features a picture of Dr. Seuss’s famed Cat in the Hat. A more accurate line to capture the revolutionary impact Theodor Seuss Geisel had on the beginning reader might be “I Can Read It All By Myself […]

Review of North, South, East, West

North, South, East, West by Margaret Wise Brown; illus. by Greg Pizzoli Primary     Harper/HarperCollins     40 pp. 1/17     978-0-06-026278-5     $17.99 Pizzoli’s digital illustrations for this never-before-published text by Margaret Wise Brown follow a little red bird whose mother sings to her about taking flight. She sets out exploring […]

Auggie and Her, Jess’s Dad and Me

Katherine Paterson’s Bridge to Terabithia was one of the first books to make me cry. I was in fourth grade when I read it, and Leslie’s death wrecked me. I wept at its suddenness, at the shock of a child’s death, and at the plain wrongness of it all while my heart ached for Leslie’s […]

Review of Nanette’s Baguette

Nanette’s Baguette by Mo Willems; illus. by the author Primary    Hyperion    40 pp. 10/16    978-1-4847-2286-2    $17.99    g Willems’s latest picture book takes place in France, where the mother of a young anthropomorphic frog entrusts her daughter, the eponymous Nanette, with the responsibility of purchasing a baguette. The village Nanette traverses on her way to the […]