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Hey, You

On Monday, September 10th at 2:00 PM EST, I’ll be interviewing Jarrett J. Krosoczka about his new graphic memoir Hey, Kiddo. Sponsored by Scholastic Press, this edition of Talks with Roger will be webcast live and we’ll even be taking questions from the audience, provided I understand the technology by then. It’s free and you […]

If They Do Say So Themselves

Here at the Horn Book we are scrupulous about giving reviewed books their full titles, even when it’s Tigers & Tea with Toppy: A True Adventure in New York City with Wildlife Artist Charles R. Knight, Who Loved Saber-Toothed Cats, Parties at the Plaza, and People and Animals of All Stripes (by Barbara Kerley with […]

Do we need another hero?

The plan to create a new Oscar for “outstanding achievement in popular film,” meaning, it seems, superhero movies and action films, has me thinking about what that would look like in children’s books. Although the Academy doesn’t seem to have worked out just how the new award will work, it’s designed to reward excellence in […]

September/October 2018 Horn Book Magazine starred reviews

The following books will receive starred reviews in the September/October 2018 issue of The Horn Book Magazine.   Imagine!; written and illustrated by Raúl Colón (Wiseman/Simon) A Parade of Elephants; written and illustrated by Kevin Henkes (Greenwillow) We Don’t Eat Our Classmates; written and illustrated by Ryan T. Higgins (Disney-Hyperion) Dear Substitute; by Liz Garton Scanlon and Audrey Vernick; […]

Devil in the details

The July 23rd issue of the New Yorker includes an article about the Holocaust in children’s literature, and particularly the contributions of Jane Yolen in The Devil’s Arithmetic (1988) and her new novel, Mapping the Bones. The article, by Ruth Franklin, makes reference to a contemporary critic of The Devil’s Arithmetic, an  “editor at a […]

What shall they read?

I wanted to call your attention to two articles we have recently published about African American children’s literature. Kim Parker and Our Elissa interviewed Denene Millner about her publishing of instant-landmark Crown: An Ode to the Fresh Cut, and her interest in black everyday life stories. Children’s literature professor Jonda McNair politely raised an eyebrow at […]

She’s no longer a gypsy

Demonstrating that the social pressure to change the names of things is not limited to librarians and Laura Ingalls Wilder, Actors’ Equity has announced that the legendary “Gypsy Robe” has been renamed the “Legacy Robe.” (Sound familiar?) The Gypsy Robe referenced neither actual Roma people nor Broadway’s most famous Gypsy (Rose Louise); it is awarded at each […]

One of these things is not like the others

ALA’s latest elucidating Interpretation of the Library Bill of Rights‘ Article VI (“Libraries which make exhibit spaces and meeting rooms available to the public they serve should make such facilities available on an equitable basis, regardless of the beliefs or affiliations of individuals or groups requesting their use”) has it in hot water. In this revision of […]

My Other Richard

When Richard Peck’s memorial service–at Lincoln Center, no less–opened last Friday morning with the Pearl Fishers duet, I thought I was going to be a goner, but I managed to hold on, in no small way helped by the care with which Richard himself had planned the program–not from Beyond but via the explicit instructions he […]

Tell Laura I love her

I first heard about ALSC’s big news on Saturday, when I was swanning about the exhibit halls with Al, and Rita Auerbach called me over to tell me that Jacqueline Woodson was the first recipient of the Children’s Literature Legacy Award. My first thought was, “well, she’s won pretty much every other damn thing so why […]