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But what IS reality, really?

Please join Children’s Books Boston for “Fact and Fiction: How and Why Authors Draw Upon Reality to Build Fiction,” a panel discussion at Simmons University on Tuesday, March 12, 2019. The panelists include novelists Liza Ketchum, Malinda Lo, and Tara Sullivan; the moderator is our own Elissa Gershowitz. 5:30-7:30 PM, top floor of the Management Building […]

R.I.P. Tomi Ungerer and a Letter from Leda

We were sorry to hear about the death of Tomi Ungerer, whose is the name I hear mentioned most frequently when illustrators talk about their heroes. The New York Times has a sympathetic and informative obit of the artist but takes one cheap shot up with which Leda Schubert, dear friend of the Horn Book, will […]

BGHB, NBA, BELPRÉ, PRINTZ…

… and tonight Elizabeth Acevedo is speaking at Simmons University,  free at 5:30 in the Paresky Center.  Go! She is a prodigious talent and, as I learned last night, a formidable dinner companion, keeping me on my toes all evening. (Thank you to Cathie Mercier for including me.) You can read her Boston Globe-Horn Book […]

I Never Do Anything Twice

For an op-ed related to the drama surrounding Blood Heir, the New York Times asked two previous Twitter storm centers, Keira Drake (for The Continent) and Jonah Winter (The Secret Project) for Lessons Learned and their takes on the current debate. I have no take beyond warning people of the folly (and unfairness) of criticizing […]

Horn Book Magazine Starred Reviews, March/April 2019

  The following books will receive starred reviews in the March/April 2019 issue of The Horn Book Magazine:   Olive & Pekoe: In Four Short Walks; by Jacky Davis; illustrated by Giselle Potter (Greenwillow). Home Is a Window; by Stephanie Parsley Ledyard; illus. by Chris Sasaki (Porter/Holiday). Hey, Water!; written and illustrated by Antoinette Portis […]

In Seattle

I’m back from ALA and, if the exhibits were any indication, can tell you one thing that is On Trend: rainbow-themed board books. Not science-rainbow or leprechaun-rainbow but FLAG-rainbow. I counted four. When I questioned the Pride flag’s relevance to a board-book-aged audience, Macmillan’s Angus Killick gave me What For, so okay, okay. In fact, […]

2019 Scott O’Dell Award for Historical Fiction

From the BCCB’s Deborah Stevenson, chair of the O’Dell Award committee:    Champaign, IL (January 18, 2019)—The 2019 Scott O’Dell Award for Historical Fiction goes to Finding Langston, by Lesa Cline-Ransome, published by Holiday House.   Chicago brings culture shock for eleven-year-old Langston, who moves there from Alabama with his father in 1946 after his mother dies.  […]

Boy, you turn me

Talking about his new book A Ray of Light for this week’s Talks With Roger, author-photographer (and BGHB winner) Walter Wick reminded me of something that I knew but had gratefully managed to forget: we see everything upside-down, and our brains correct the difference. When I think about that I have trouble walking. But with […]

Happy New Year

Happy New Year, everybody. I hope you got some good reading done over the holidays. Me, I shuttled among Tim Mohr’s Burning Down the Haus (a history of punk rock in East Germany), Ruth Ware’s The Death of Mrs. Westaway, and Jane Austen’s Mansfield Park, those latter choices, each about a poor cousin come to […]

Counting on You

Jason Low has announced that the Diversity Baseline survey is back. Publishers, book reviewers, agents (now with agents!) please join in. If the numbers are better than they were five years ago (and I suspect they are), the first iteration of this survey should be credited with some of that success.