November Nominations Results

The November Nominations at Calling Caldecott are in!

We asked for readers to give us four titles that they thought were worthy of the Caldecott Award. Big thanks to everyone who posted on the website and social media.

We will have one more round of nominations. In early December, we will ask for three nominations, so stay tuned for that, and participate! 

Here’s what the nominations showed: 

  • Eighteen total titles were nominated

  • Seven titles have more than one nomination. The leading title is An American Story (illustrated by Dare Coulter; written by Kwame Alexander), followed closely by Big (written and illustrated by Vashti Harrison)

  • Eleven titles have a single nomination. That’s more than half. The real Caldecott committee must consider all titles — even those that receive a single nomination. 

  • My takeaway: While a few titles garnered more consensus, by and large, the field is still open and full of some surprises. 

Here is our list of November nominations. Stay tuned (and contribute!) in early December when we put out our final call for three nominations. 

TITLE

AUTHOR

TOTAL

An American Story

Alexander/Coulter

4

Big

Harrison

3

Beautiful Noise: The Music of John Cage

Rogers/Na

2

Jumper

Lanan

2

There Was a Party for Langston

Pumphrey and Pumphrey

2

Tomfoolery

Markel/McClintock

2

A Walk in the Woods

Grimes/Pinkney and Pinkney

2

The Artivist

Smith

1

Evergreen

Cordell

1

Finding Papa

Krans/Bui

1

Fungi Grow

Gianferrari/Sudyka

1

I’m From

Gray/Mora

1

Nell Plants a Tree

Wynter/Miyares

1

The North Wind and the Sun

Stead

1

Remember

Harjo/Goade

1

The Skull

Klassen

1

The Tree and the River

Becker

1

The Walk

Bingham/Lewis

1

Julie Hakim Azzam

Calling Caldecott co-author Julie Hakim Azzam is the assistant director of the MFA program in the School of Art at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. She holds a PhD in literary and cultrual studies, with a specialization in comparative contemporary postcolonial literature from the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) and Southeast Asia. Her most recent work focuses on children's literature, stories about immigrants and refugees, and youth coping with disability.

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