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Books mentioned in the November 2018 issue of Notes from the Horn Book

Five questions for Traci Sorell and Frané Lessac We Are Grateful: Otsaliheliga by Traci Sorell, illus. by Frané Lessac, Charlesbridge, 5–8 years. Noticing nature’s cycles They Say Blue by Jillian Tamaki, Abrams, 5–8 years. Look at the Weather by Britta Teckentrup, trans. by Shelley Tanaka, 5–8 years. Quiet by Tomie dePaola, Greenwillow, 3–7 years. Winter […]

From the Editor – November 2018

As award-speculation season begins, don’t forget you can join in the chatter about the Caldecott Medal on our Calling Caldecott blog, and about the Newbery on the Heavy Medal blog over at SLJ. We are in the midst of reading and discussion for Fanfare, the Horn Book’s own choices for the best books of the […]

Foreseeable futures

Speculative fiction can provide an effective vehicle for authors to comment on and critique the state of our own world. The following new YA novels examine timely social issues in new settings, whether far-flung galaxies or uncomfortably close-to-home dystopian societies. (And by the way, did you know The Hunger Games just celebrated its tenth publication […]

Historical heroes and heroines

These novels for intermediate and middle-school readers show landmark moments in history through the eyes of perceptive preteens. Young Zora Neale Hurston and her friend Carrie are pulled into another mystery involving their tight-knit African American community in Zora and Me: The Cursed Ground. The main narrative, set in 1903, alternates with that of a […]

Noticing nature’s cycles

These picture books invite readers to reflect upon the cycles of our environment (i.e., weather patterns, seasons) and to pay close attention to marvels of the natural world. In They Say Blue by Jillian Tamaki, a girl considers the wondrousness of the world around her, prompted by the colors she encounters throughout her day. The […]

Five questions for Traci Sorell and Frané Lessac

We Are Grateful: Otsaliheliga by Traci Sorell, illustrated by Frané Lessac (Charlesbridge, 5–8 years), is a lushly illustrated, through-the-seasons look at a contemporary Cherokee community’s daily life, pausing for celebrations of traditional observances (e.g., Cherokee New Year) and making special note of gratitude. 1. “Cherokee people say otsaliheliga to express gratitude. It is a reminder […]